IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 Forum Rules PLEASE READ Before Submitting Recipes for Review
2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Nice Northern German Altbier recipe..., ... after many attempts
kenlenard
post Jan 27 2010, 09:12 AM
Post #1


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



After much snorting and pawing at the ground, I made this Altbier in September 2009. I went back and found a recipe of Andy's (Blktre) that I made years ago but messed up by either fermenting too warm or using yeast that was sub-par healthwise. I reformulated the recipe based on that recipe and everything else I could find online regarding Altbiers. It sat in the keg at 35° for about 3 months and I just bottled some over the weekend for a local beer gathering.

Otto's Altbier

6 lbs Pilsner Malt
3 lbs Munich
8 oz Crystal 80°L
8 oz Wheat
4 oz Melanoidin Malt (mash temp ~148°)
½ oz Magnum 14.4% for 60 minutes (7.2 AAU)
½ oz Hallertau 3.7% for 20 minutes
Wyeast 1007 German Ale yeast

OG: 1.054, FG: 1.012, IBU: 35, SRM: 11, ABV: 5.2%


After some discussion about the Yakima Magnums, I decided to try it here. Some of the local brewers tried to talk me out of the wheat, but I LOVE to add some wheat for head stability so I used a half pound. Remember that there is N. German Alt (maltier), Münster Alt (lighter in color and gravity), Dusseldorf Alt (hoppier) and Sticke Alt (higher in ABV)... this one is N. German.

(IMG:http://home.comcast.net/~kenlenard/altbier1.JPG) (IMG:http://home.comcast.net/~kenlenard/altbier2.JPG)

This post has been edited by kenlenard: Jan 27 2010, 09:13 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Amiaji
post Jan 27 2010, 09:24 AM
Post #2


Assistant Brewer
Group Icon

Group: Guest Moderator
Posts: 95
Joined: 10-May 08
From: Denver, NC
Member No.: 12,107



Very nice looking beer. I am planning to make an Alt in the near future, I might give your recipe a try. What temperature did you ferment it at?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenlenard
post Jan 27 2010, 09:31 AM
Post #3


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



This one probably sat in primary between 58° and 60°... the 1007 will ferment down to about 55° and I like to keep a clean profile & ferment low. Cheers.

This post has been edited by kenlenard: Jan 27 2010, 09:31 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
DavidS
post Jan 27 2010, 07:13 PM
Post #4


Brewmaster
Group Icon

Group: Guest Moderator
Posts: 519
Joined: 2-November 07
From: York, SC
Member No.: 10,395



Nice looking bier and better looking glass. The Uerige glasses are hard to come by these days. Why did you go the meloidian/Crystal 80 route rather than Carafa III?

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenlenard
post Jan 27 2010, 08:50 PM
Post #5


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



QUOTE(DavidS @ Jan 27 2010, 08:13 PM) *
Nice looking bier and better looking glass. The Uerige glasses are hard to come by these days. Why did you go the meloidian/Crystal 80 route rather than Carafa III?

I was slightly concerned that the Carafa III would add some roastiness and that's not my thing. I prefer more caramelly flavors as opposed to the roastier flavors from roasted barley or chocolate.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ryno
post Jan 27 2010, 08:55 PM
Post #6


Brewer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 172
Joined: 30-September 07
From: blowing rock, nc
Member No.: 10,152



QUOTE(DavidS @ Jan 27 2010, 07:13 PM) *
Nice looking bier and better looking glass. The Uerige glasses are hard to come by these days. Why did you go the meloidian/Crystal 80 route rather than Carafa III?


Wouldn't going with the melanoidin and Crystal ensure a maltier bump to the beer while still providing the desired color Carafa III provides?
That's my guess and pretty much what I'd do with my German beers (except Schwarzbier) to boost color and flavor, plus a longer boil/decoction.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenlenard
post Jan 27 2010, 09:07 PM
Post #7


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



You could make that same statement about something like a red ale. You could go the crystal/special b route and get a deep red color and a malty base. You could also use crystal and something like black malt, chocolate or roasted barley, still get a nice deep color but a roastier flavor. Maybe the maltier one would be an American Red and the roastier one an Irish Red. Anyway, I bounced this recipe around numerous times and the melanoidin was suggested for its malty contribution and nobody raised an eyebrow about the C80L. I did have a few people tell me to ditch the wheat, but I can't see a half pound of wheat being a problem and I like its ability to create head stability. Cheers guys.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SkiWithG
post Jan 28 2010, 07:01 AM
Post #8


Assistant Brewer
***

Group: Members
Posts: 75
Joined: 21-June 07
From: South Jersey
Member No.: 9,438



Ken,

What temp did you ferment at?

Cheers,
Glenn
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
slothrob
post Jan 28 2010, 07:37 AM
Post #9


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,154
Joined: 8-January 06
From: Down by the banks of the river Charles.
Member No.: 4,990



Really pretty.

The only problem I see with the Crystal 80 is that I'd think it would come out more like an American microbrewery interpretation of an Alt, something like Long Trail, instead of a German Northern German Altbier, like Schwelmer Alt. Or maybe even more like a California Common.

You should try it sometime with half that amount of CaraMunich instead of the Crystal 80, and a small amount of Carafa Special. The roast flavor from the Carafa Special is very subdued, especially after lagering, but it's part of the dry finish of a Northern German Alt, in my opinion. I'd be concerned that the Crystal 80 would interfere with that finish.

Don't take me wrong, though, I bet it's delicious!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenlenard
post Jan 28 2010, 08:46 AM
Post #10


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



QUOTE(SkiWithG @ Jan 28 2010, 08:01 AM) *
Ken,

What temp did you ferment at?

Cheers,
Glenn

Between 58° and 60°.

QUOTE(slothrob @ Jan 28 2010, 08:37 AM) *
Really pretty.

The only problem I see with the Crystal 80 is that I'd think it would come out more like an American microbrewery interpretation of an Alt, something like Long Trail, instead of a German Northern German Altbier, like Schwelmer Alt. Or maybe even more like a California Common.

You should try it sometime with half that amount of CaraMunich instead of the Crystal 80, and a small amount of Carafa Special. The roast flavor from the Carafa Special is very subdued, especially after lagering, but it's part of the dry finish of a Northern German Alt, in my opinion. I'd be concerned that the Crystal 80 would interfere with that finish.

Don't take me wrong, though, I bet it's delicious!

I don't usually have Carafa, but I could see this beer with the CaraMunich and some Carafa... but how much Carafa? Maybe just 2-3 ounces or something? I always have CaraMunich on hand. Cheers!

Ps. When I was out in Vermont a few years ago, I stayed at an inn right across the street from the Long Trail Brewery in Bridgewater Corners. I thought the Long Trail Ale was really nice. Not sure if this is close, but it wouldn't be a problem for me if it was! Cheers.

This post has been edited by kenlenard: Jan 28 2010, 09:03 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
slothrob
post Jan 28 2010, 12:47 PM
Post #11


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,154
Joined: 8-January 06
From: Down by the banks of the river Charles.
Member No.: 4,990



Right around 2 ounces, if I recall correctly. I'll check my recipe and see what I used. I always keep CaraMunich, too. Nice malt. Denny seems to prefer just using Sinamar for color, and I'm sure he's made a lot more of these than me, but I find I get just a vary subtle bite from that small amount of roasted malt. Your water may influence the quality of the flavor you get from dark malts, too.

This may have become my favorite style (well, maybe Duesseldorf, a bit more), and I'm making two batches this month. I like Long Trail, too. It's very common around here, and it's a great fall-back position at a number of restaurants. One that I know I'll be happy with. I think maybe it's drifted a bit from the style, compared to the couple German ones I've had, but it's a very nice beer. Of beers from this region, I think Tuckerman Brewing's Headwall Alt might be a more authentic example (since the Schwelmers seems to have stopped being imported). I think Southampton's is pretty decent, too, but they certainly don't seem to like it over at Beer Advocate, so maybe my tastes aren't very universal.

Your recipe certainly sounds tasty, though, and the color is beautiful. I'm just always crusading to get people to try some of these styles, that probably were produced without much if any Crystal Malt, with less in their own brewery. Sometimes I get the feeling that every time an American Brewery tries to make an historical style they resort to adding Crystal Malt, giving the entire country a house flavor. So feel free to ignore me.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenlenard
post Jan 28 2010, 02:09 PM
Post #12


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,906
Joined: 15-July 03
From: Chicago, IL
Member No.: 892



QUOTE(slothrob @ Jan 28 2010, 01:47 PM) *
So feel free to ignore me.

No, I totally agree with you and understand where you're coming from. I talk with BryanH (no longer posts here, I believe) often and he always tells me to simplify things and go easier on the specialty grains. I was making a Vienna and had some crystal in there too... he told me to just use Vienna and maybe some Carafoam and go from there. Same with my Oktober... he likes Munich, Vienna and little else. I have dialed my use of specialties way down. I also consult Designing Great Beers by Daniels to see what goes into these classic styles... but just because he has a chart that says that 68% of all entries in the Alt category contained Crystal, it doesn't necessarily make it traditional. This is why I like to bounce the ideas around first and see what the purists have to say. We're on the same page, Amigo. Cheers!

This post has been edited by kenlenard: Jan 28 2010, 02:12 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jasper
post Jan 30 2010, 09:19 AM
Post #13





Group: New Member
Posts: 3
Joined: 21-July 09
Member No.: 14,851



I really like this beer but I can't find many commercial examples of the style to compare and really know if I'm being true to the style. There also seems to be a lot of debate on whether this beer is more Munich based or more Pilsner based. I prefer a little more Munich in mine and have the crystal at 5%. Magnum is such a firmly bittering hop that I think you need a little crystal to balance it. This is definitely an ale that benefits from lagering too. I usually lager it for 4 weeks in the keg.

Alt-Malt 10 gallon
10.00 lb Munich Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 48.90 %
9.00 lb Pilsner (2 Row) Ger (3.0 SRM) Grain 44.01 %
1.00 lb Caramunich Malt (56.0 SRM) Grain 4.89 %
0.25 lb Melanoiden Malt (20.0 SRM) Grain 1.22 %
0.20 lb Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM) Grain 0.98 %
2.00 oz Magnum [10.40 %] (60 min) Hops 34.3 IBU
1.00 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [6.00 %] (1 min) (Aroma Hop-Steep) Hops -
1.00 oz Campden Tablet (Boil 60.0 min) Misc
2.20 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
6.00 gm Chalk (Mash 60.0 min) Misc
German Ale (Wyeast Labs #1007) [Starter 3000 ml] Yeast-Ale

Est Original Gravity: 1.050 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.012 SG
Bitterness: 34.3 IBU
Est Color: 13.7 SRM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RunDownHouse
post Jan 31 2010, 07:38 AM
Post #14


Brewer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 432
Joined: 25-August 05
From: Nashville
Member No.: 4,244



slothrob,

Have you posted your recipes for your alts?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
slothrob
post Jan 31 2010, 09:54 AM
Post #15


Brewmaster
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,154
Joined: 8-January 06
From: Down by the banks of the river Charles.
Member No.: 4,990



I haven't posted an Alt recipe here, I don't think. Since Ken has Northern German Alts well covered here, I'll post a Düsseldorf Alt recipe I really like. I'll start another thread, so I don't highjack Ken's thread any more than I already have. I can't take photograph's like Ken's, though!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
2 User(s) are reading this topic (2 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 8th December 2019 - 01:54 AM