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> Immersion Chilling: One-step or Two?
Pilgarlic
post Feb 20 2010, 04:06 PM
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I have 50' of 3/8 reefer tubing and I want to decide whether to go with 15' ice-bath pre-chiller and 35' of immersion wort chiller or to put all 50' into the wort chiller with tap water temp. I live in Florida and our "cold" tap water typically isn't, very.

Any experience or ideas?

Thanks.
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Hoppy1
post Feb 20 2010, 05:56 PM
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I guess it depends on your batch size. I would say if your brewing only 5 gallons split the coil and make a pre chiller, especially living in FL. I run 1/2" 50' chiller with 10 gallons and use a prechiller here in NM and would suggest using the same if your doing 10 gallons.
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Pilgarlic
post Feb 20 2010, 06:16 PM
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QUOTE(Hoppy1 @ Feb 20 2010, 05:56 PM) *
I guess it depends on your batch size. I would say if your brewing only 5 gallons split the coil and make a pre chiller, especially living in FL. I run 1/2" 50' chiller with 10 gallons and use a prechiller here in NM and would suggest using the same if your doing 10 gallons.


I'm doing five gallons. Also considering skipping the pre-chiller altogether, going with a 50' chiller, bringing it down most of the way with tap water and finishing it with siphoned ice water. May end up there. Thanks.

This post has been edited by Pilgarlic: Feb 20 2010, 06:17 PM
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howlingthunder
post Feb 20 2010, 07:09 PM
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I use a pre-chiller too with my 50' immersion and can get the wort down in the 80's real quick. I put my pre-chiller in a bucket of ice and water. Depends on the brew obviously for pitching temp, but I have heard of a two step that goes like: 1. Chill down to 80's 2. Use oxygenator to add O2 while it cools down another 10 degrees.

Honestly, I usually have to resort to a 5 - 10 minute ice bath in the kitchen sink to get the last 10 - 15 degrees off. San Diego water is in the 60's year round so not much help either.
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jwatkins56550
post Feb 21 2010, 12:19 AM
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Definitly make a 50 ft chiller and buy a submersible pump to pump ice water through it. It will work much better than a pre chiller. Plus if you upgrade to larger batches, you'll be able to handle the cooling.
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Highlander
post Feb 21 2010, 01:06 PM
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I do partial boils. I typically have about 3.5 gallons to cool, and my cold water is cold. I have a 50 foot IC, with 1/4 inch tubing. It does the job without a pre-chiller, bringing down the temps to below 70 in about 15 minutes. If you are doing full 5 gallon batches, you will need every bit of that 50' of 3/8 tubing.

If your cold water is usually above 60 F, you should also invest in additional tubing to make a pre-chiller, or other method to get cold water through the coils.
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vantuckeybrew
post Feb 21 2010, 02:51 PM
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I run a 35' IC with no prechiller and it does fine for me. Takes about 20 min to get down to 70F. I'm in the pacific NW and our water tends to run cold unless brewing on a hot day in the summer, but even then it still works pretty well. I would use the full 50' to go into a IC with no pre-chiller. If you fin you need a prechiller, than buy a submersible pump, but I think you'll find you don't need one, just make sure when you bend it into the IN that wou fit it to the shape of your kettle. I recently bought a new kettle and I am going to have to unwind mine and reform it to the larger kettle.
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bishbosh70
post Feb 22 2010, 03:29 PM
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I also live in Fl, and my fosset water is about 78F in the summer.

I first used only an immersion chiller, but the last 20F was a bugger, so now have 2 step IC. -
I cool it to about 120 to 130F using just fosset water, then add ice to the pre-chiller.(Just enough water to cover the coils when ice added) You don't save much adding the ice before this, as the fossett water ends up melting it, and I'd run out of ice for when I needed it.
I also add a fair amount of salt to the water, as I read somewhere it helps - but can't confirm.

I have about 30' chiller amd 20' pre-chiller.

This post has been edited by bishbosh70: Feb 22 2010, 03:31 PM
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Dean Palmer
post Feb 24 2010, 02:23 PM
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Use all 50' for the chiller and then buy a submersible pump (~$30)to run in an ice water bath to pump ice water through the coil after the wort is down near 100f using the tap water.

Prechillers are not very effective down here in the heat, but if you used 15' of the coil for a pre-chiller and ran the pre-chiller only after the wort was down near 100f after using the tap water that is a workable but less efficient solution.

The problem is that with tap water around 80F ++ most of the year, you are never going to get wort to pitching temps without some ice. Even getting to within 10 degrees of the tap water temps takes forever anyway, so you'll probably be switching to the ice water around 110F.

This is the biggest brewing problem to fight with here in Tampa Bay.
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RunDownHouse
post Mar 7 2010, 08:42 PM
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Any rec's on a submersible pump? I want to get one to cut down on water waste and was looking at this, but I don't know much about pumps and so I'm not sure if that's got the power to pump through 50' of copper plus tubing.
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mf5325
post Mar 8 2010, 01:14 AM
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QUOTE(RunDownHouse @ Mar 7 2010, 05:42 PM) *
Any rec's on a submersible pump? I want to get one to cut down on water waste and was looking at this, but I don't know much about pumps and so I'm not sure if that's got the power to pump through 50' of copper plus tubing.

Try Home Depot, they have a 300+ gph pump that will move a lot of water quick, 2 10# blocks of ice ans 3 gallons of water should get you there pretty quick, (although I cheat and use a 3 Gallon bucket).

Cheers
Mike
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Dean Palmer
post Mar 8 2010, 09:18 AM
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Home Depot will take a lot more of your $$ for no reason for pumps. Go to Harbor Freight or Northern Tool type places and spend 75% less and get the same thing.

1/3 to 1/2HP works well. Don't get anything listed as a pond pump as they won't be as efficient as possible.
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RunDownHouse
post Mar 8 2010, 06:57 PM
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QUOTE(Dean Palmer @ Mar 8 2010, 08:18 AM) *
Home Depot will take a lot more of your $$ for no reason for pumps. Go to Harbor Freight or Northern Tool type places and spend 75% less and get the same thing.

1/3 to 1/2HP works well. Don't get anything listed as a pond pump as they won't be as efficient as possible.

Great, thanks for the info on HP. I didn't see a HP listing on the one I linked, only a GPH figure. It also didn't say it's a pond pump, but I don't know if "submersible' is essentially the same as "pond." Like I said, I don't know nothin bout no pumps. Any idea on how the one I linked would do, or have any links to pumps you've had success with?
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Dean Palmer
post Mar 8 2010, 08:33 PM
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QUOTE(RunDownHouse @ Mar 8 2010, 06:57 PM) *
Great, thanks for the info on HP. I didn't see a HP listing on the one I linked, only a GPH figure. It also didn't say it's a pond pump, but I don't know if "submersible' is essentially the same as "pond." Like I said, I don't know nothin bout no pumps. Any idea on how the one I linked would do, or have any links to pumps you've had success with?


The one linked above is not suitable whatsoever. It might be fine for a bird bath, but nothing more :-) (I have one sitting in the garage here) It will barely get a trickle through an immersion chiller, and so slowly that the cooling water is saturated with heat in about the first inch, and most chillers are 20' +.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/disp...temnumber=94648

That is the link to the 1/2HP I use currently. Some other folks report that the 1/3HP will work as well. Keep in mind that it takes a lot to push the volume we need through a chiller to get the velocity to utilize the chilling capacity of a copper coil, and the resistance is great. Bigger HP is better, and no less than 1/3HP.
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