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> Flow Control Faucets
Mattman
post Dec 22 2013, 06:50 PM
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I'd like to get some flow control faucets for my kegerator, and I have been looking at Perlick 545PC, which is chrome plated brass. However, I would prefer an all stainless steel unit, and I read a thread from about a year ago, which said Perlick would be coming out with stainless steel flow control faucets in early 2013, but my search from this afternoon didn't come up with anything on them. Have you guys and gals heard anything about them? As an alternative, I would be willing to look into the Vent-matics, but I don't know if they have the flow control option. Also, I have read some bad things about the quality of the Vent-matics. What do you all know about the quality of Vent-matics (and the Perlick flow control faucets, for that matter).

Thanks,

Matt
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pilsenhammer
post Dec 27 2013, 07:20 PM
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Matt,

I have Perlicks. I have always heard that Ventmatic was the Cadillac of taps being that they have interchangeable tips to vary the flow/back pressure depending on the carbonation level of the beer being dispensed from each tap. Also, IIRC, the Perlick is a knock-off of the Ventmatic, but there are no interchangeable tips to my knowledge. I have no experience with a flow-control faucet. What makes you interested?
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Mattman
post Dec 27 2013, 08:54 PM
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My interest lies in the idea that the flow control valve will throttle back the flow to provide a good pour with the desired amount of head, even if I have a beer that is overcarbonated, and don't take the time to get hose lengths correct and all that. I want the forward seal design so they don't stick after lack of use for a few days, but I figured that for a few dollars more, why not get this extra feature that will probably help when I have differing carbonations amongst the various beers I'm serving.
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pilsenhammer
post Dec 31 2013, 07:08 PM
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A cheap way of getting a good pour is to very the length of your lines. A 10' line (3/16") can give you a nice pour at 3-4 volumes of carbonation. There are also these epoxy mixing nozzles (available at HD and Menards) you can insert in your line to cause restriction and control foaming. The zig-zaggy looking thing is removed from the tube and inserted into your beer line to improve foam-free performance with highly carbonated beers. Haven't tried this yet, just heard about it. Something you might want to experiment with.

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Mattman
post Jan 2 2014, 03:28 PM
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Hmmm, interesting thought. I'll have to check into that mixing nozzle idea. I've heard of similar things, but not one quite like this. And maybe I should consider it. Still, I have to say that there is something appealing about being able to dial in the flow at the tap.

On a related topic, I've heard other folks talk about using 10 feet or so of beer line to cut down on the foaming of highly carbed beers. I never had done that, but what do you do when you have a keg that you taken to a outside event, such as a game or a picnic? I have never seen anyone with 10 feet of line at an event like that, and it seems they sometimes have to bleed off pressure every so-often to get a decent pour. Your thoughts?
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pilsenhammer
post Jan 5 2014, 04:53 PM
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When I take a keg to an event it is always in a garbage can full of ice. If I had a 10' line, I would just keep most of the line in the ice and a couple feet of slack sticking out for pouring with a blanket covering the top. I have never used a jockey box, just because it is easier to schlep a can of ice and beer kegs than to deal with cleaning out the lines in a JB. JMHO.

Currently I have several lines 5-6' and one 2' that I use for bitters. The longer ones serve me fine for the types of beer I brew.
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Mattman
post Jan 5 2014, 08:56 PM
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Good to know, thanks!
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