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> Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout Cone
Guest_Lee_*
post Oct 17 2004, 06:35 PM
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Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout Cone

I am considering brewing the all grain clone of the Brooklyn Brewery’s Black Chocolate Stout. The recipe that I am referencing is one from Beer Captured on page 109. Anyone brewed this one?

Anyway the recipe calls for 4 oz. of Malto Dextrin. What is the difference between Malto Dextrin and Lactose?

Are there any other BBCS clone recipes out there? I would be interested to see how they compare.

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johnbarleycorn
post Oct 17 2004, 07:54 PM
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Here is Triple Freaks recipe for this clone. I was going to brew it but forgot to get the extract. I might change it to a chocolate cherry stout.

Clone
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Guest_Lee_*
post Oct 20 2004, 09:17 PM
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Thanks JBC. I will compare.
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bonjour
post Oct 21 2004, 02:26 PM
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A little google and here is more than you wanted to know.

The short answer is that Lactose is a disaccharide and Malto-destrin is a blend of many, mostly higher saccharides. The detailed googled answer is below.

Fred (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/cheers.gif)

Malto-dextrin is the most complex fraction of the products of starch conversion. It is tasteless, gummy, and hard to dissolve. It is often said to add body (palate fullness) to beer, increase wort viscosity, and add smoothness to the palate of low-malt beers. However, it is easy to increase the dextrin content of grain beers by changing the mash schedule or using dextrin malt. Malto-dextrin is of interest mainly as a supplement to extract brews.

Excerpted: ADM's 5 D.E. Maltodextrin is a non-sweet, nutritive saccharide that is produced as a white, odorless powder. This specialty product has a multitude of functional properties and can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Some of the properties that make ADM's maltodextrins highly versatile are low sweetness, binding properties, solubility, non-hygroscopic, low browning tendency, freezing point control, crystal inhibition, film forming properties, and low osmotic pressure. Typically, maltodextrins have various off flavors, odors and even color differences. Characteristics to look for in a maltodextrin: appearance, taste, odor, white powder, bland, odorless.
Clintose Mlatodextrins are consistently bland or neutral in flavor and odor and are water-white in color. This allows the formulator to increase the amount of maltodextrin used because the maltodextrin does not mask the desired flavors in the product. In terms of clarity, Clintose Maltodextrin has elminated any haze or color-forming compounds, which is very important in beverage applications. This property makes them superior flavor carriers and carbohydrate sources in instant beverage mixes, sport drinks and soft drinks. Most maltodextrins retrograde or have color changes after 24 hours, but Clintose Maltodextrins has been processed to remain stable, giving improved color removal and color stability. Known amounts of minerals can be added in the application when the maltodextrin is free of any trace minrals and inorganic ions. Clintose Maltodextrins has a total absence of minerals, which might be an advantage in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industry, allowing the addition of minerals to the application system. Some essential properties are:
Dextrose Equivalent


Moisture, % max...... 6.0

PH, 20% solution.... 4.5

The typical Carbohydrate Profile (Dry Basis):
Dextrose, % 0.3
Maltose, % 0.8
Trisaccharides, % 1.3
Tetrasaccharides, % 1.4
Higher saccharides, % 96.2

In terms of microbiology, the total plate count is 100/g max, mold and yeast are both at 50/g max, and it is negative for coliforms, E. coli and salmonella. This food ingredient is Generally recognized as Safe (GRAS) and complies with all the conpendial requirements of the U.S. National Formulary and Food chemical Codex.
There are references to < 5% and < 12% fermentability, depending on the source.

Lactose is a disaccharide that is not broken down by brewing yeast. Other disaccharides are fermentable.

One of the most well known and used of the disaccharides is Sucrose also commonly called "table sugar". Sucrose is made up of a Glucose and a Fructose molecule connected by the removal of a water molecule. Such a linkage is called a "glycosidic linkage". During digestion special molecules called digestive enzymes are responsible for the breakdown of the Sucrose molecules. The particular enzyme responsible is called "Sucrase" and cleaves the glycoside links specifically to yield one molecule each of Glucose and Fructose. Fructose is the carbohydrate that we find that usually in our foods that make things taste sweet. We put it on our cereal and in our tea and coffee that we drink. Sucrose is gotten from sugar cane stalks or sugar beets. Both are pulverized, and the sucrose is extracted from the juices of the sugar cane or sugar beets.

A second disaccharide is called Lactose. It is also known as "milk sugar" that is the main disaccharide sugar found in milk and other dairy products. It is composed of a Glucose and a Galactose simple sugar units. A different digestive enzyme called lactase is responsible for the cleavage of the glycoside linkage between the Glucose and Galactose units that makeup a lactose molecule. Then the Galactose must be converted to a Glucose molecule before entering the bloodstream. This enzyme called Galactosidase is responsible for this most important conversion. Sometimes infants lack sufficient galactosidase enzyme for this conversion and increases in levels of galactosidase can cause serious brain damage or even death among infants suffering from this enzyme deficiency. The remedy is to put the infant on non-dairy substitute so that lactose will not be ingested into the body. Because of the maturation process older people sometime lack this galactosidase enzyme. This is because of the body's inability to produce it or enough of it. These adults develop what is called a lactose insensitivity.

A third disaccharide is called Maltose or sometimes called "Malt Sugar". Maltose is composed of two Glucose molecules connected. The enzyme responsible for its breakdown is called "Maltase".
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Guest_Lee_*
post Oct 22 2004, 04:31 PM
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Thanks Fred. Sometimes you just don't think about the obvious.
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bonjour
post Oct 22 2004, 05:25 PM
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Not a problem, I'm sure that there are a lot of others here that learned something from that excercise, I know I did.

Fred (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/beerchug.gif)
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