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> Recipe request for Hoppy Copper Ale (IPA?), Recipe request for Hoppy Copper Ale (IPA
SGT Brew
post Apr 11 2003, 07:48 AM
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Kevin--You could always call the brewery and ask for a recipe, or at least a list of ingredients.  That would get you a start.  There was a local brewpub in Columbus, GA that had a great red on tap, and since I live in Mississippi, it was kinda cost prohibitive to drive there every weekend for a brew.  I called up and asked the brewer for the recipe, explained my situation, and he had no problem giving me the recipe, although it was for 400 gallons (had to scale it down a bit).

sarge
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Guest_Ted_*
post Apr 11 2003, 01:55 PM
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kevin, what's the name of the beer? Someone may have a clone for it already. Either that or try one of the IPA's alreadt posted and it will probably be close.
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dsaliba
post Apr 12 2003, 09:31 PM
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SGT,

When in Rome...can't you upgrade to 400 gal capacity??
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SGT Brew
post Apr 13 2003, 08:52 AM
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CJ--Do you remember the post in the main forum about me trying to figure out how to seal the bed of my pickup truck so I could boil the whole 400 gallons???

Seems like a good idea, but not real sure what to do with 400 gallons of beer.  Also, I would need 4267 bottles.  Any idea where I can get that many in a short notice?

sarge
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Guest_kevin11_*
post Apr 9 2003, 10:49 PM
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Hi everyone.  The IPA (2nd batch so far - I'm new at this) I just made is ok,  but it's not what I was hoping for.  
I lived near Seattle 2 years ago for work, and used to go for a beer sometimes in a small place in Kirkland next to Lake Washington.  The beer was beyond wonderful.  It was made by a local brewer.  I don't know if I can say the brewer name here or not since it would be kind of a plug,  but the beer was copperish, w/ almost a tinge of red in color.    It had a nice hoppy flavor that you could smell.  It's hard to describe but it was very floral in nature.   I am almost certain that it was an IPA but I wouldn't bet my life on it.   I wouldn't call it a sweet beer but it wasn't dry either.  Basically, I could have gulped it down all day and night (which is probably a bad thing I guess) but you know what I mean.  It was the best beer I have ever had.  I  am not up to all grain yet but if anyone knows of an extract/grain combination recipe that would even come close to this description, or could point me to one that resembles what I have described, I would be thankful.    I have read alot of recipes, and alot of them sounded good, but none of them described what I am looking for in terms that made them sound really similar.   I may just not know the right questions to ask or info to volunteer but maybe some of you can figure out what I am talking about if you have had some of the NW beers.  
Thanks,   Kevin

(oh, and for anyone that is curious,  the last batch I referred to was a large can of Muntons bitter ale w/ a pound of light DME and 2 lbs of amber DME.  It started out at 1.05 and ended around 1.005. I fermented it for 3 weeks and it sat for 3 weeks.  It's not bad now.  I mean, it's still alot better than some from the store (and not better than others)  but my heart isn't breaking when I give some away either.   It's very dark too.  I was surprised how dark it turned out, since it was more amber when I bottled.  I don't mind that since Guiness is one of my all time favorites but it's not what I was shooting for this time.  Oh well.  beer is kind of like fishing.  It's got to be really bad for me to complain, and even then,  I'm probably still enjoying it.   )
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cj in j
post Apr 11 2003, 11:48 AM
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QUOTE(SGT Brew @ April 11 2003, 9:48 pm)
he had no problem giving me the recipe, although it was for 400 gallons (had to scale it down a bit).

Why???  ???  ???  ???
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SGT Brew
post Apr 11 2003, 03:07 PM
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QUOTE
Why???


He said that this is the size of the batch that they make...

sarge
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cj in j
post Apr 13 2003, 04:41 AM
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Sarge, what I meant is why did you have to scale it down??? Go for it! (Of course, you'll need a bigger pot  B) .)
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Guest_Ted_*
post Apr 13 2003, 09:00 AM
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I think if we all shipped our empty bottles, we could supply you. But then you have to ship them back full, can you afford that?!!!! (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/biggrin.gif)
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Guest_kevin11_*
post Apr 13 2003, 10:19 PM
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Thanks everyone.  I have looked up the info on the IPA. I am still not positive this is the exact beer I had, but based on the process of elimination, and the description, it's got to be the one.   So far, here is what I have found out:

From their web site:
Out of the gate and going strong, Hale's new Mongoose IPA has been enthusiastically received by hop-head fans throughout the Northwest. Nearly 50 pounds of hops are used in making this flavorful beer, including an abundance of Amarillo leaf hops used to dry hop the beer in its final conditioning tank. The end result is an IPA with a wonderful aromatic hop bouquet, a pleasant hop bitterness with citrus overtones and a deliciously round and lingering aftertaste.

Ingredients:Pale malted barley, Crystal malts, Centennial and Nugget hops, Hale's special yeast and filtered water.

Original Gravity 10.60 "   End of quote.

10.6.  Doesn't this seem really high for an OG?  I realize this is not the same format I normally see, but, isn't this equivalent to about 1.106 ?   I also realize IPA's are supposed to have a higher OG than other beers but, wow.  
Thanks for the input.

Oh,  I took homebrew camping for the first time this weekend.  Sitting on the banks of the Guadalupe river in the company of a couple of good friends w/ a mellow campfire crackling on a cool Texas spring night sipping my homebrew out of a heavy flip top bottle made it taste better than it was last time I mentioned it.
- Kevin
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SGT Brew
post Apr 17 2003, 09:34 AM
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ted--my cabinets are already overflowing with bottles.  Not enough for a 400 gallon batch though...

sarge
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Osh
post Apr 17 2003, 12:34 PM
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Kevin11 - The 10.6 looks like Plato - but I don't have my tools here right now so I can't verify that for sure.  See is someone else can convert 10.6 degrees Plato into the specific gravity that you're used to.
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cj in j
post Apr 17 2003, 11:05 PM
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10.6 is approximately 1.042.

In other words, multiply the Plato reading by 4 to get gravity points:

10.6 x 4 = 42.4 = 1.0424

Hope that helps.
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Guest_Hengist_*
post Apr 18 2003, 01:04 PM
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The 10.60 on their spec sheet is a typo; it should read 1.060.  All of their other beers' gravities are given in relative gravity, so I don't think this one is 10.6 degrees Plato.
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