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> Baron Noir Sparkling Dry Cider, French Cider
What's your opinion?
What's your opinion?
10 - Excellent [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
9 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
8 [ 1 ] ** [50.00%]
7 [ 1 ] ** [50.00%]
6 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
5 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
4 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
3 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
2 [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
1 - Never Again [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
Total Votes: 4
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HighTest
post Dec 20 2005, 08:30 PM
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Baron Noir Sparkling Dry Cider,Cidre Sauvage Brut, 4.0% abv, Prouduced by Cidrerie du Val de Vire, Normandie - France.

I was very pleased with this cider. It had a very different (unlike any apple that I can recall), but distinct sweet apple aroma. Its flavor is crisp, light, and clearly apple flavored, lightly carbonated. The acidity is quite mild with just a hint of a bite in the aftertaste. This is an excellent cider - serve cold! (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)

The list of ingredients: 100% fermented apple juice, carbon dioxide, contains sulfites. That's it.

I bought this cider from: Liquid Solutions, Price $6.80/ 750 ml bottle - This I would definitely buy again. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/biggrin.gif)
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HighTest
post Dec 21 2005, 09:47 AM
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I contacted (via email) the producer of this French cider in an attempt to identify the names of the apples that are used to make the Baron Noir cider. Their reply was,
QUOTE
There are many types of apples pressed to make the Baron noir. I could not tell you the name because they are so many... They are all cider apples and they all come from a specific area in Normandy.
Although I don't know the actual names of the apples used, there is a distinct difference between cider apples and those commonly used to make the "cider" we have come to know in the USA. Even though I have been told this several times, only when I've actually tasted the US & foreign ciders has the difference become clear. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/wink.gif)
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ScottS
post Dec 21 2005, 07:53 PM
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I enjoyed this cider, though I wouldn't give it top marks.

Amber in color, slightly cloudy (perhaps because the sediment was stirred up in transit), just a little fizzy. I first impression upon opening the bottle and taking a whif is a nice apple aroma, slightly sweet smelling. Certainly not what I expected from a dry cider. Upon tasting, that impression remains. I've made some dry ciders, this I would classify as off-dry or maybe even semi-sweet. Low but pleasant acidity, very low tannins, very nice apple flavor, low alcohol, and very smooth. It almost reminds me of conventional apple juice with a teeny bit of a kick. Basically, what Woodchuck dreams of being. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/tongue.gif)

I'm rating this a 7 because yes it is a nice cider, one of the better commercial ciders I've had to date, but it is fairly simple in flavor profile. It's pleasant, but there's not much to it. For $7 though, I'm pleased. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)

By the way Hightest, when I smell this stuff I think Cortland apples. I doubt that is what they are using because it is neither a traditional cider apple nor is it French, but it's one of the more aromatic American apples. I've got a stand of those for use as a base for my cider. They are not common, but there is one place here in MI that grows them in quantity for sale to the public. Cortlands are one of my favorite eating apples as well.

Edit: I'd also be interested to know what yeast they are using.....

This post has been edited by ScottS: Dec 21 2005, 07:54 PM
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HighTest
post Dec 21 2005, 08:10 PM
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QUOTE(ScottS @ Dec 21 2005, 08:54 PM)
...Certainly not what I expected from a dry cider.  ...I'm rating this a 7 because yes it is a nice cider, one of the better commercial ciders I've had to date, but it is fairly simple in flavor profile.  ....By the way Hightest, when I smell this stuff I think Cortland apples.  Edit: I'd also be interested to know what yeast they are using.....
Yes, I thought that as well about the 'dryness'. Then I read this from someone commenting on ciders,
QUOTE
..I hadn't realized that in France, "sweet cidre" refers to a very specific beverage that is about 2 percent alcohol by volume...
So this 4% cider may be what the French deem as a "dry cidre". (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/wink.gif) I gave it an 8 only because it was so much better than Blackthorn & Strongbow, and I had nothing else to compare it to. I may change that rating after trying the others.

I don't believe I've ever come across Cortland apples, but I think I've heard of them. I'll be on the look-out for them. It would be interesting to eat one to see how it tastes naturally.

Regarding the yeast, you may be able to get that info directly form the cider makers. Try emailing capucine.leroy@lecomptoirdescidres.com . He was very prompt at replying to my emails. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/wink.gif)
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