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> Hop of the Week (HOTW) - Columbus/Tomahawk, What do you think?
Hop of the Week (HOTW) - Columbus/Tomahawk
Overall rating of Columbus/Tomahawk
5 -- Fantastic! [ 19 ] ** [30.16%]
4 [ 19 ] ** [30.16%]
3 [ 4 ] ** [6.35%]
2 [ 3 ] ** [4.76%]
1 -- Don't like them. [ 1 ] ** [1.59%]
0 -- Never tried them [ 17 ] ** [26.98%]
Total Votes: 79
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just-cj
post Jun 21 2006, 11:39 PM
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I actually received a request for the HOTW -- I feel just like "BYO Replicator"!
QUOTE
Hey CJ,

I would love to see Columbus for a HOTW. It's a mysterious hop for me. With 16.5% AA, it can bite you in the rear if not respected as a bittering hop, but some of my favorite beers use Columbus, sometimes with just one other hop, and I love it. I would love to learn how to tame this beast. I'd also like to learn about others experiences. I've only been brewing for 9 months and have only brewed with around 7-8 varieties. Thanks for the thread. It's a great way to learn about real world experiences. Looking forward to the weeks to come.

Take care,

al_bob
So, Columbus it is. Here's the lowdown from HopUnion on this high-alpha hop.
QUOTE
US COLUMBUS
Pedigree: Bred and selected from the Hopunion breeding program.
Maturity: Mid-season to late
Pickability/Drying/Baling: Good
Cone-Structure: Medium to large dense, rounded cone
Lupulin: Plentiful, pale to mid-yellow
Aroma: Pungent
Alpha Acids: 14 – 16% w/w
Beta Acids: 4.5 – 5.5% w/w
Co-Humulone: 30 – 35% of alpha acids
Storageability: Below average alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 20şC
Total Oil: 1.5 – 2.0 mls/100 grams
Myrcene: 25 – 45% of whole oil
Humulene: 15 – 25% of whole oil
Caryophyllene: 8 – 12% of whole oil
Farnesene: <1% of whole oil
General Trade Perception: Originally bred for its alpha value, it has also become popular for its oil profile. Great for dry hopping.
Possible Substitutions: Nugget, Chinook, Wye Target, Northern Brewer, possibly Centennial
Typical Beer Styles: US IPA, US Pale Ale, Stout, Barley Wine, Lager (Bittering)
Additional Information: Also know as Tomahawk. Considered similar to Zeus.

And since HopUnion admits that Tomahawk is the same hop as Columbus (the name is different due to trademark issues), let's also look at what Yakima Chief has for Tomahawk.
QUOTE
TOMAHAWK®

(IMG:http://www.yakimachief.com/hopvarieties/images/tomahawksm.jpg)

Origin/History: Tomahawk® is a bittering hop of recent origin, bred by Charles Zimmermann. It is the first commercially grown "Super Alpha" variety. In 1998 it contributed to 11% of the USA hop crop.
Agronomics: Moderate tolerance to downy mildew, Peronospera. Good pickability of a large compact cone.
Maturity: Late to very late.
Brewing Quality: Used primarily as a bittering hop.
Alpha acids: 14-18%
Beta acids: 4.5-5.8%
Alpha:Beta Ratio: 3.1
Cohumulone (% of alpha acids): 30-35%
Total Oil (Mls. per 100 grams): 2.0-3.5
Caryophyllene (as % of total oils): 7-12%
Farnesene (as % of total oils): 0%
Humulene (as % of total oils): 10-22%
Myrcene (as % of total oils): 25-40%
Storability is poor.

So, what have all you people done with Columbus/Tomahawk? Good and bad experiences, recipes, questions, comments, advice, confusion, or pretty much anything about this high-alpha hop are appreciated.

And, let me know what hop you want to see next!
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WhiteSoxFan
post Jun 22 2006, 12:07 AM
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I voted "never used it", but I bought 2 oz. of whole last week. They will be going into Denny's Rye IPA that I'll be brewing sometime in the next few days.
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just-cj
post Jun 22 2006, 12:12 AM
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Let us know how that turns out!
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azmtnbiker
post Jun 22 2006, 12:18 AM
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I have never tried them. If chinook is a sub then I might stay away from them or use just a little to get some added bitterness. Although some hops are very different when used for bittering compared to aroma or flavor.


CJ- suggestion for the next hop of the week. Spalt or perle or any other german hops other then what we have already covered.
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BrewerGeorge
post Jun 22 2006, 12:21 AM
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I've used it twice and have mixed feelings. I jumped on the low-cohumulone wagon right after I started brewing, so columbus may be the highest cohumulone hop I've ever used. I recently brewed an IPA with lots of columbus and it turned out very well. However, it does have a strongly lingering bitterness. I'm talking 3 or 4 seconds of lingering. It's definately a 'harsher' bitterness than the amarillo or simcoe that I typically use. I chose the columbus in this IPA purposely for some backbone, but I think I went overboard. I have a few more ounces, and I'll try it again but with a smaller amount.
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just-cj
post Jun 22 2006, 12:44 AM
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QUOTE(azmtnbiker @ Jun 22 2006, 02:18 PM) *
CJ- suggestion for the next hop of the week. Spalt or perle or any other german hops other then what we have already covered.
It's better if you send me a PM -- that way there's a chance I'll remember when next week or the week after roll around. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/blush.gif)
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BeerGod
post Jun 22 2006, 04:16 AM
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I love them! They are my exclusive flavor/aroma hop in my IPA (with chinook as the bittering hop! (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/tongue.gif) ). I love high cohumulone hops and generally don't use the "smooth" bittering hops like magnum. I started on the low cohumulone band wagon but found I liked a "courser" bitterness.
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Danno6102
post Jun 22 2006, 06:05 AM
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This one of my favorite hops. Awesome for dryhopping american Pale & IPA's! I haven't used it much as a flavor hop so can't comment there. I agree with George that the bitterness is a little harsh & does seem to linger a bit.
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tjthresh
post Jun 22 2006, 06:45 AM
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Those of you that are familiar with Russian River's Pliny the Elder, Columbus is the feature hop. At least according the the recipe in the Sept 04 BYO that we all know and love. I intend to brew this up in the next few weeks.
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erichonour
post Jun 22 2006, 07:45 AM
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I like Columbus as a bittering hop, and actually find it to be considerably smoother than Chinook.

I haven't used it as a flavor/aroma hop.

EH
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drewseslu
post Jun 22 2006, 08:12 AM
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I've used in the Imperial Oatmeal American Brown Ale and the latest Braggot. It almost seems like a 50/50 split of Chinook and Simcoe...almost.
I love it as a finishing and flavor hop, but I haven't used it for bittering...yet.
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Chez
post Jun 22 2006, 08:33 AM
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Columbus is one of my favorites. I think it works great as a FWH, and i absolutely love the aroma it produces as a flavor/finishing addition. I havent used it a whole lot lately though because i am almost out. Hops Direct will get an order from me as soon as i see they have them again.
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al_bob
post Jun 22 2006, 09:21 AM
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I voted fantastic, but I'm still trying to figure this one out. We ordered a pound of them and they came in at 16.5% AA. We brewed my first beer ever with all grain and single hop Columbus. Looking back, I believe the beer tasted bad more from too high fermentation temps. than from overuse of the Columbus hops.

Someone else told us that the taste of our beer was from the Columbus hops. So, I was a little spooked about using them after that. After brewing for a while now, I realize the hops weren't the culprit. It was very bitter and we did go overboard on the bittering addition, but I'm convinced it's a good hop.

My favorite regional IPA is from Sweetwater Brewing Company, in Atlanta. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/headbang.gif) (IPA link) RateBeer says they use Columbus and EKG. This beer is so yummy when you get it fresh. It has a "best by" date on the bottle, and the closer you get to that date the more the hop flavor falls off.

So, for bittering, you have to respect this hop. I'm just getting around to finding a better balance with this hop. Our latest IPA, ready for bottling, tastes good. We backed off on the bittering, by loading up with EKG and just a little Columbus, then going heavy on the flavor and aroma with Columbus. Dry hopped with an ounce each of Columbus and EKG. It' seems like it's gonna be closer to what I'm trying to get.

I would love to hear of any other commercial beers using just Columbus or any combination with them. Any clone recipes would be great, too, cause I'm determined to figure out this hop.

tjthresh: do you have that clone recipe for Pliney the Elder?

I'll try and post back when our latest IPA comes out of the bottle.

Thanks for adding this one CJ!

Al

This post has been edited by al_bob: Jun 22 2006, 09:24 AM
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friedlbug
post Jun 22 2006, 10:57 AM
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Is this a citrous-like tasting variety? I'm looking to try something new, but am not big on the "citrousy" hops.
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drewseslu
post Jun 22 2006, 11:09 AM
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QUOTE(friedlbug @ Jun 22 2006, 10:57 AM) *
Is this a citrous-like tasting variety? I'm looking to try something new, but am not big on the "citrousy" hops.

Yea...its one of those 'C' hops for sure. You may want to look in a different direction.
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