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> Joe's Ancient Orange
buzzardwhiskey
post Nov 23 2006, 09:18 PM
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I put this one together after our big Thanksgiving dinner:

3.5 lbs honey
3 little tangerines cut in eighths (rind and all)
1 small handfuls of raisins
1 stick of cinnamon
1 vanilla bean
1 whole clove
1 tsp Fleischmann's bread yeast
balance water to one gallon (3 inches from top)
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hiddendragonet
post Nov 24 2006, 11:58 AM
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I made this once and I really did not like the bread yeast's effects. It left it way too sweet, and not nearly enough alcohol. I would do this recipe again but with a real wine yeast next time. The only way I can drink it is to mix it with club soda.
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buzzardwhiskey
post Nov 24 2006, 07:18 PM
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Yeah, I thought I'd give it a try just to say
I've done it. If it's too sweet in a few months
perhaps I'll add some Nottingham Ale yeast.
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cRuZ
post Nov 25 2006, 07:27 AM
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Why would you add Nottingham Yeast when the bread yeast probably has more attenuation than the ale yeast? I agree with HIDONDRAGONET that you should ass some higher attenuating yeast if you want it dry, or if not, live with the effects of the bread yeast. Should finish pretty sweet. Good luck and enjoy!

Regards,
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buzzardwhiskey
post Nov 25 2006, 11:03 AM
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That's cool. I had no idea that bread yeast could get up into the teens like Nottingham!

QUOTE(cRuZ @ Nov 25 2006, 05:27 AM) *
Why would you add Nottingham Yeast when the bread yeast probably has more attenuation than the ale yeast? I agree with HIDONDRAGONET that you should ass some higher attenuating yeast if you want it dry, or if not, live with the effects of the bread yeast. Should finish pretty sweet. Good luck and enjoy!

Regards,
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Dave in Indiana
post Oct 3 2007, 06:07 AM
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Made a two gallon batch of this last night ... anyone else have a batch going?
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armagh
post Oct 3 2007, 02:11 PM
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anyone else have a batch going?

No. A couple of people around here have made it and from what I've sampled, I would not be inclined. Came off tasting like orange cough syrup. If yours turns out OK, let us know. Doesn't seem like much to commit in terms of resources and time if it turns out to be drinkable.
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Dave in Indiana
post Oct 3 2007, 08:07 PM
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That's what I was thinking, too.
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hountzmj
post Oct 3 2007, 09:11 PM
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I've made it several times. It's not bad for what it is.

I've found that it's best to give it MUCH more time than the "recipe" calls for. I made 12 gallons to give as christmas gifts last year. I have a few bottles left that are getting better all of the time. The burn mellows quite a bit over time and the orange actually seems to come back a bit.

3.5 lbs /gal is a lot of honey for the bread yeast. One of my first batches came out cloying sweet. The batches I gave as gifts ended up much better and I only used 3 lbs / gallon.

I've also found that it is beneficial to rack off of the fruit and such and then rack again before bottling.

--hountzmj
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Dave in Indiana
post Oct 4 2007, 05:36 AM
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When did you rack it off the fruit? At the 2 month bottling target suggested by the recipe?
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hountzmj
post Oct 4 2007, 06:08 AM
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QUOTE(Dave in Indiana @ Oct 4 2007, 06:36 AM) *
When did you rack it off the fruit? At the 2 month bottling target suggested by the recipe?


I think I actually waited until the fruit fell to the bottom... you can speed this along by gently rocking the carboy every so often or by using a vacuvin sp? to degas via a vacumme. It was probably around 3 months actually. I can look at my notes this evening.

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Dave in Indiana
post Oct 4 2007, 11:43 AM
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It smells good, but I can see where it could turn out to be orange cough syrup.
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MAZ
post Oct 7 2007, 03:47 PM
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My neighbor and I made a 2.5 gallon batch of this stuff. Like someone above said, for what it is, I'm pretty amazed that it tastes this good. It's certainly not the best mead I've ever tried, but I'll happily drink it.

Our fruit didn't fall, but the mead cleared beautifully in the last week (and it was about 1.5-to-2 months in the primary... I didn't really keep notes on this one). It's sweet, but I can also feel the alcohol from the 6 oz sample I just tried. I racked it to one of my 3 gallon cornies and put a small layer of CO2 on it. I may crank up the CO2 and make it a sparkling mead. Has anyone done that with this mead?
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beninak
post Oct 29 2007, 07:51 PM
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QUOTE(MAZ @ Oct 7 2007, 11:47 AM) *
I may crank up the CO2 and make it a sparkling mead. Has anyone done that with this mead?


This was the second mead that I ever made. I had a one gallon natch that was in preimary for 2 months then I racked off the fruit into secondary for about another month and a half before I bottled. It tasted good, but apparently it wasn't done fermenting because it bottle carbonated. Still pretty good but I think I preferred it still.

Since this was so quick and easy to make, I put together a 6 gallon batch to try to hold us over until the more high-quality meads get done. Its been in primary for 3.5 months, but the fruit hasnt dropped yet. I just took a sample and it seems kinda bitter, probably from the orange rinds. I'm gonna rack it off the fruit and let it age for a couple fo months to see if that taste mellows out at al.
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Dave in Indiana
post Nov 29 2007, 09:18 PM
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Approaching 2 months, fruit is still floating, but mead is very clear.
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