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> Roeselare Blend Options, Sour beer ideas/possible group brew
doobahstop
post Feb 3 2009, 10:37 PM
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I am guessing that it is too cold down there for the bugs to do much. I am guessing your floor level temp is probably in the low 50s. Warm it up a bit or just be patient. It's not going anywhere.

On another note, Saturday is the bottling day. I will let you all know what the tasting notes are, along with the sheer joy/misery that this ordeal is sure to entail. It looks as though I will not have enough champagne bottles to do it all that way, so I am going to first fill 3 or 4 cornies (depending on the final bottle count), and then do as many champagne bottles as we can. I am pretty sure that I should have 60-100 champagne bottles. The rest will go into standard 12 oz bottles.

The process that Mob Barley has come up with to package the contents of the barrel is as follows: Fill kegs. This will take a lot of weight out. There has been some talk of a harness system with pulleys or some other device for the purposes of mechanical advantage. We may be able to lift it enough on our own though. Then, slabs of wood will be used in Lincoln Log stack fashion to raise the barrel for further siphoning. 4 bottling buckets will be utilized to keep it all moving as quickly as possible.

If this all works out, I would love to trade some samples.
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Ben Z.
post Feb 4 2009, 11:54 PM
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What/how much are you adding to the bottles (yeast, sugar)? I also decided on this weekend to empty my "barrel" (carboy+white oak dowel). Going to keg some and wanted to bottle some.
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doobahstop
post Feb 5 2009, 04:40 PM
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I may add some fresh yeast but I am not sure how well it will like that acidic environment. I will definitely be adding corn sugar to carb though. Maybe not with the kegs, maybe 2 naturally carbed, 2 forced. We shall see. I have been thinking about maybe adding some nonfermentable sugar to go for a sweeter take for some, depending on how dry it has turned out.
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MtnBrewer
post Feb 5 2009, 05:33 PM
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QUOTE(doobahstop @ Feb 5 2009, 02:40 PM) *
I may add some fresh yeast but I am not sure how well it will like that acidic environment. I will definitely be adding corn sugar to carb though. Maybe not with the kegs, maybe 2 naturally carbed, 2 forced. We shall see. I have been thinking about maybe adding some nonfermentable sugar to go for a sweeter take for some, depending on how dry it has turned out.

The brett should ferment your priming sugar, no?
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Ben Z.
post Feb 5 2009, 05:54 PM
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QUOTE(MtnBrewer @ Feb 5 2009, 05:33 PM) *
The brett should ferment your priming sugar, no?


I figured it would, but they are getting kind of long in the tooth (18 months) and didn't know if they were viable enough. How many volumes CO2 should I shoot for? Flanders reds aren't usually as highly carbonated as geuezes, right?
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MtnBrewer
post Feb 5 2009, 06:23 PM
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QUOTE(Ben Z. @ Feb 5 2009, 03:54 PM) *
I figured it would, but they are getting kind of long in the tooth (18 months) and didn't know if they were viable enough. How many volumes CO2 should I shoot for? Flanders reds aren't usually as highly carbonated as geuezes, right?

I believe that's right. Maybe around 2.0 - 2.5 volumes....but that's just a SWAG.
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shaggaroo
post Feb 5 2009, 07:05 PM
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Hey Andy! Good luck on bottling day, I do not envy you... how's by you? Haven't talked to you recently, Casey and I are going back to Belgium in May.
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Slainte
post Feb 5 2009, 07:55 PM
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QUOTE(MtnBrewer @ Feb 5 2009, 05:33 PM) *
The brett should ferment your priming sugar, no?


Yep, it should, especially if the pH is above 3.4. Brett will stop reproducing at 3.4, but still might be able to ferment...especially since the acid ales tend to get pretty low..in the 3.1-2 range. I couldn't find any information on what pH it stops fermenting.

I've made 100% Brett beers in the past and bottle conditioned with no problem.
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Ben Z.
post Feb 8 2009, 03:20 PM
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Kegged the batch yesterday. Also did 3 750s w/sugar and 2 750s half-and-half with an 11.5% barleywine with the hope that the residual sugar (got 78% apparent attenuation) would be enough to carbonate and not explode. We'll see.

The flavor seemed MUCH closer to rodenbach as compared to the high temp (mid 70s) bucket 5 gallons. There was the sweetness, the back-of-the-throat acetic burn, most of the minor flavors, but, there was a distinct blue cheese note in the aftertaste. Not the really funky/amonia boutique blue cheeses you sometimes find, but a "clean" blue cheese tast much like maytag, if that makes any sense. I'll report back on the flavor in a week or so once it's carbonated.

Doobah, how did your bottling day turn out?
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doobahstop
post Feb 8 2009, 03:57 PM
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It went very smoothly. I ended up with around 49+ gallons. I kegged 20 gallons, then corked a few cases of Belgian style 750s, then 93 Champagne-style bottles (which could possibly be Champanoise-ized later), 130 12oz bottles, one 1.5L Champagne magnum, and one 3L former Chimay Blue bottle (which we drank, it was a 2006 and very delicious). That is a lot of beer.

My co-Mob Barley member Alex and I rigged up a hoisting system above the barrel and lifted it off of the floor a foot and a half or so and this proved to be enough height to make the siphoning work quite well. I think it took us about 6-7 hours to do it all, from arranging our mise en place to the final wipedown and cleanup. Very smooth and efficient. We had some lovely ladies drive in from Buffalo to cook us pizza to keep us moving.

But now we get to talk about what this is all about... The Beer. I have to say that I was quite nervous when I popped the bung to start the siphon. It sure smelled good, but in the back of my mind I couldn't help but wonder if I may have $600 worth of really good malt vinegar.

First thing first, I measured the gravity. It finished out at 1.008. Very nice and dry. Again, it smelled phenomenal. Then it was the moment of truth. I got my glass all ready and poured myself 5-6 oz and stuck my nose right into it. On the nose it has a nice oak touch, mixed with that glorious brett and company funk. Nice and earthy. Then I tasted it. I can without a doubt say that this is far and away the best beer I have ever brewed. The acidity is nicely played against the body, very well balanced. I couldn't find one thing wrong with it. The color is a deep rich amber to red color and is crystal clear. I added in 3/4 cup of dextrose in a pint of water to every 5 gallons along with a nice slurry of Wyeast 2000 to carb it. The yeast selection was for its clean character and Alex had a ton of it, so might as well.

If anyone is thinking about trying this on this scale, I would highly recommend it. Mob Barley will definitely be doing this again. I am going to build a big barrel rack in my basement to make the siphoning easier next time for sure. I am seriously considering brewing some lambic for a few years and later blending for gueze. I found the experience to be wonderfully rewarding. I hope all of you guys out there working on the reds get similar results to mine. This stuff is kick ass. If any of you want to trade, I would be game. The bottles should sit for a couple of months but after that, game on.

*edit* I will have some pics soon

This post has been edited by doobahstop: Feb 8 2009, 03:57 PM
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jrstren
post Jun 3 2009, 01:34 PM
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Bumping an awesome thread. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/notworthy.gif)

I'm thinking of doing a Flanders Red with the Roeselare that Wyeast has (once again) put out and I came upon this thread in my research.

My questions (a poll of sorts):

1) For those of you that "pre-pitched" a yeast before adding the Roeselare at secondary, what were your ultimate results? How did your sourness eventually turn out?

2) For those of you that pitched the Roeselare into the primary, did you eventually rack to secondary or just let it stay on the cake the whole time? If you racked, when? What were your ultimate results?

Thanks!
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Pete Maz
post Jun 3 2009, 02:02 PM
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Dang, I still have mine sitting in my closet in 2ndary. I originally pitched US-05 for primary, which brought it from 1.069 down to 1.019. Then added the bugs to the 2ndary which, as of spring '08, had brought it to 1.011. Still not dry or sour enough for what I wanted, so I let it ride for another year. I really need to sample that puppy again and see what's become of it.
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dagomike
post Jun 5 2009, 08:45 PM
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Mine from last May is still down in the dark. I'll probably rack it to keg around October. Not sure if I'm doing a batch this year. Probably not. Not doing a whole lot of brewing. The 07 batch is in carbonated and in chilled. It's pretty nice. Curious how the 08 compares.
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doobahstop
post Jun 16 2009, 07:11 PM
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I am still very pleased with this project. After carbing, I had a bit of diacetyl come out, I think from the pedio in the blend. It had since faded out. These bottles are truly alive. They seem to change by the hour. I love the stuff now, I'm excited to taste them over the years.

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rocdoc1
post Jun 21 2009, 07:47 PM
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Today I racked my Roselare blend Belgian strong dark ale (for lack of a specific recognized style) onto 7 pounds of fresh cherries. I brewed this beer(OG 1.078) in January of 2007, racked to secondary in February that year and it's sat in my beerroom since then. Summer temps get to 85, winter down to freezing, but there it sat for over 2 years. Today when I racked it back into a 6.5 gallon carboy full of cherries I poured myself a glass and it's amazing. I almost wish I had bottled it as is but 3 or 4 months on the cherries worked great for my last attempt at a beer like this.
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