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> Hop of the Week -- Pacific Gem, High Alpha Hop from New Zealand
just-cj
post Jan 21 2008, 03:03 AM
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Pacific Gem
High Alpha hop from New Zealand


This is a high-alpha hop bred and grown in New Zealand. Here's what New Zealand Hops has to say:

(IMG:http://www.nzhops.co.nz/images/hop_varieties/pacific_gem.jpg)

QUOTE
New Zealand Pacific Gem
Available in either conventional or organic form

A Triploid Alpha type bred from the New Zealand variety “Smoothcone” crossed with Californian Late Cluster x Fuggle. Developed through the hop breeding programme of the New Zealand Horticultural Research Centre known now as HortReseach and released in 1987.
Selection:
Does not carry the punchy aromas usually associated with higher Alpha hops. Pacific Gem contains a good balance of oils which constantly contributes to its aroma score. A very pleasing hop with useful bittering potential with Alpha Acids at 13 % and above.
Brewer’s notes:
Pacific Gem fills the brew house with enticing aromas during kettle addition and has been described as producing oaken flavours with a distinct blackberry aroma. Typically used as a first hop addition and makes its presence felt through an excellent tempered bitterness and flavour. Well suited to a wide range of beer styles and lends itself well to European Lager styles of various bitterness levels.
Grower comments:
-- Maturity: Mid season
-- Yield: Moderate to high
-- Growth Habit: Vigorous, clavate frame
-- Cone Structure: Long, compact, ovate shape
-- Disease Resistance: New Zealand is hop disease free
-- Storage Stability: Good
Technical data:
HPLC & Oil Composition (Measured within 6 months of harvest, stored at 0 ºC)
-- Alpha Acids: 13 - 15 %
-- Beta Acids: 7 – 9 %
-- Cohumulone: 37 - 40 % of Alpha Acids
-- Total Oil: 1.2 ml oil per 100 gram cone weight
-- Concentration: 78 uL Oil/gram Alpha
-- Myrcene: 33.3 %
-- Humulene: 29.9 %
-- Caryophyllene: 11 %
-- Farnasene: 0.3 %
-- Citrus-Piney Fraction: 9.4 %
-- Floral Estery Fraction: 1.8 % (Linalool 1 %)
-- Xanthohumol: 0.6 %
-- Other: 11.6 %
Applications:
Sought internationally for its ability to deliver consistent alpha much of the crop is transformed by supercritical CO2 to resin. This creates a reliable off-season source of kettle extract for the northern hemisphere brewer.
Pacific Gem pdf File

So what are your experiences with this hops? Any good recipes? Let's find out about some of these lesser-known hops! (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)
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blktre
post Jan 21 2008, 08:48 AM
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One word..........Yack. The description sounds rather appealing. But very little of this hop goes a very long way. So with my only experience with it is if you think your using just enuff, use less. Never did get the flavor of curant out of it.
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lowendfrequency
post Jan 21 2008, 09:42 AM
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I've heard alot of good reviews on this hop, so I purchased a few ounces to try out. It seems like picking the right style of brew is essential with using this strain. Anyone have any suggestions? I was thinking of using it to bitter a BDSA with sterling for flavor and aroma additions.
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REM
post Jan 21 2008, 11:24 AM
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QUOTE
Cohumulone: 37 - 40 % of Alpha Acids


A curious new word. As blktre noted the high alpha content is not in the same humulone:cohumulone ratio as some of the finer noble hops.

It might be worth your time to compare this compound to that of your favorite, or normal bittering hops.

QUOTE
http://byo.com/departments/884.html

It has become accepted dogma among brewers to think of each of these humulones to have different bitter characteristics. There are some that swear that the bitterness associated with cohumulone is "harsher" than that from humulone. Other studies have shown no difference in sensory impact when each of the different humulones are compared. Nevertheless, the humulone:cohumulone ratio is now quoted in hop analyses and new varieties are being bred with low cohumulone levels in mind. Historically, the most highly prized hop varieties - including noble hops such as Hallertau, Tettnang and Saaz - also happen to be those that have low cohumulone levels.


My favorite to compare to:

QUOTE
http://www.czhops.cz/saazhops.html

Fine Saaz aroma hops are typical by their ratio of alpha-bitter acids to beta-bitter acids which is usually 1:1.5

Hop alpha bitter acids are a mixture of several analogues of humulone. In natural mixtures of alpha-bitter acids humulone and cohumulone are prevailing according to variety, growing locality and a grade of maturity. Saaz hops have cohumulone contents of up to 28%. Genetically different varieties, for example English green-bine-hops have cohumulone contents as high as 40%. Lower cohumulone content is considered to be a guarantee of a more delicious bitterness because iso-cohumulone is probably a carrier of ruder bitterness with respect to different physical-chemical properties from the other two analogues. It can also be said that from the point of view of the structure of hop bitter acids, fine aroma hops with higher contents of beta-bitter acids give beer a more delicate bitterness. It is especially important for brewing Czech type beer whose typical representative is Pilsner Urquell.


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Mike H
post Jan 21 2008, 11:31 AM
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Good HOTP, since I have a pound of this on the way from freshops.

I'll report back when i have some results (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)

mike

QUOTE(REM @ Jan 21 2008, 10:24 AM) *
A curious new word. As blktre noted the high alpha content is not in the same humulone:cohumulone ratio as some of the finer noble hops.

It might be worth your time to compare this compound to that of your favorite, or normal bittering hops.
My favorite to compare to:

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REM
post Jan 21 2008, 12:32 PM
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I'd thought that all bittering hop additions were equal, aside of the AA percentage and time. I can see that that's certainly not so now, so you guys spared me quite a bit of grief. Doing lagers I might have done 4-6 batches before discovering that I had "rude" bittering compounds that definitely would have adversely affected my light lagers!

Live and learn. Hanging out in the right places helps...


Has anyone run across anything on using Pacific Gem as flavor and aroma hops? They smell quite pleasant!



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Dave Louw
post Jan 21 2008, 01:12 PM
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QUOTE(blktre @ Jan 21 2008, 05:48 AM) *
One word..........Yack. The description sounds rather appealing. But very little of this hop goes a very long way. So with my only experience with it is if you think your using just enuff, use less. Never did get the flavor of curant out of it.


+1. One of the members in my club that makes great beer did an experiment with an all Pacific Gem beer to try it out. Totally undrinkable. You might be able to sneak some in for bittering but go very light.

Dave.
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mga
post Jan 21 2008, 01:44 PM
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I have brewed with this hop twice. The first in September of 06, and the last one just last week (which is still in the primary.

Both were APA type recipes, and both used Pacific Gem (13.6AA) with Organic New Zealand (8.0AA) (another down under offering).The one last year used .75 oz. of Pacific Gem for bittering and 1.0 oz. at flame out. the new Zealand was used for flavor additions. It was a very good beer, and quite hoppy according to my tasting notes. It clocked in at 48 IBU's.

The one I did last week I switched the hops around a bit and used Pacific Gem at .75 oz FWH and .50 at flame out. I backed the IBU's down to 35. So we shall see.

So far I would give this hop a good report.
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zymot
post Jan 21 2008, 02:49 PM
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A couple years ago, the LHBS did a an all organic Pale Ale for an Earth Day demonstration.

They used organic Pacific Gem from new Zealand.

It was harsh and rough going into the fermentor.

I never tasted the finished beer.

Use with caution.

zymot

By the way. I understand York and New York. But what about Zealand and New Zealand?
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Lagerdemain
post Jan 21 2008, 03:03 PM
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Quite a variety of responses, I see. I'm thinking this could be one of those polarizing hops - like Fuggles, Cluster Willamette, that people either adore or despise. Could be it's a hop that is best utilized in certain specific contexts and not in others. It could also be that it is unusually susceptible to poor handling and distribution conditions. Dunno, but I think it's a hop more people will start using because it's available. Perhaps we can gather some information about what to look for with this hop and how best to use it.

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just-cj
post Jan 21 2008, 05:05 PM
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QUOTE(mga @ Jan 22 2008, 03:44 AM) *
I have brewed with this hop twice. The first in September of 06, and the last one just last week (which is still in the primary.

Both were APA type recipes, and both used Pacific Gem (13.6AA) with Organic New Zealand (8.0AA) (another down under offering).
Would you mind posting a recipe here (in this thread) to give people an idea of what you did?
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just-cj
post Jan 21 2008, 05:08 PM
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Oops, caught by the double-post gnome!

So, instead of a wasted post, I'll add that Lagerdemain has a great idea -- tell us more specifically what worked and what didn't work for you, and then we'll all be able to get a better idea of how to appropriately use this hop. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)

This post has been edited by just-cj: Jan 21 2008, 05:09 PM
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mga
post Jan 21 2008, 06:07 PM
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QUOTE(just-cj @ Jan 21 2008, 06:05 PM) *
Would you mind posting a recipe here (in this thread) to give people an idea of what you did?


CJ --This is the recipe that I brewed in September 06 (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)


APA Organic

A ProMash Brewing Session - Recipe Details Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 6.00 Wort Size (Gal): 6.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 13.50
Anticipated OG: 1.058 Plato: 14.30
Anticipated SRM: 7.4
Anticipated IBU: 48.6
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
88.9 12.00 lbs. Marris Otter Great Britain 1.037 3
3.7 0.50 lbs. Crystal 40L America 1.035 40
1.9 0.25 lbs. Cara-Pils Dextrine Malt America 1.033 2
3.7 0.50 lbs. Munich Malt (Bonlander) Germany 1.037 9
1.9 0.25 lbs. Soft White Wheat Malt America 1.040 2

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.75 oz. Organic Pacific Gem Whole 13.60 36.6 60 min.
1.00 oz. Organic New Zealand Whole 8.00 9.7 20 min.
0.50 oz. Organic New Zealand Whole 8.00 2.4 5 min.
1.00 oz. Organic Pacific Gem Whole 13.60 0.0 0 min.


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP001 California Ale

And this is the recipe that I brewed last week, which is still in the primary

APA Organic

A ProMash Brewing Session - Recipe Details Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 6.00 Wort Size (Gal): 6.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 13.50
Anticipated OG: 1.058 Plato: 14.26
Anticipated SRM: 7.2
Anticipated IBU: 36.6
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
88.9 12.00 lbs. Marris Otter Great Britain 1.037 3
3.7 0.50 lbs. Crystal 40L America 1.035 40
1.9 0.25 lbs. Cara-Pils Dextrine Malt America 1.033 2
3.7 0.50 lbs. Munich Malt(2-row) America 1.035 6
1.9 0.25 lbs. Wheat Malt America 1.038 2

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.75 oz. Organic Pacific Gem Whole 13.60 13.7 First WH
0.75 oz. Organic New Zealand Whole 8.00 21.5 60 min.
0.25 oz. Organic New Zealand Whole 8.00 1.4 10 min.
0.50 oz. Organic Pacific Gem Whole 13.60 0.0 0 min.


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP051 California Ale V


Hope this helps (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/biggrin.gif)
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mga
post Jan 21 2008, 06:29 PM
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QUOTE(Lagerdemain @ Jan 21 2008, 04:03 PM) *
Quite a variety of responses, I see. I'm thinking this could be one of those polarizing hops - like Fuggles, Cluster Willamette, that people either adore or despise. Could be it's a hop that is best utilized in certain specific contexts and not in others. It could also be that it is unusually susceptible to poor handling and distribution conditions. Dunno, but I think it's a hop more people will start using because it's available. Perhaps we can gather some information about what to look for with this hop and how best to use it.



I do agree with the above.

For the record I just took a gravity sample and tasted this new version. Needs aging, but destined to be an excellent beer. The lower IBU's (from the previous beer)definitely helps.

I think that this hop may be one of those that needs another hop to go with the recipe. Maybe it does not do well solo.
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al_bob
post Jan 21 2008, 07:10 PM
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Thanks for adding this HOTW, CJ. I have 8oz of Pacific Gem, now and will have another 8oz in a day or so.

It really reminds me of Columbus in that it is real high %AA, and real high co-humulone. Columbus totally messed me up when I first started brewing. Now I'm learning to brew with them and making it work. Columbus does well with other hops, too, and this may be the way to use PG.

I use Chinook regularly, and have figured out the "safe" zone for bittering with it. I hope to be able to do the same with the PG.

With the prices of hops, I really like the %AA for the dollar thing. I'm learning to brew with the higher AA hops and liking it. You can use much less hops for the money. I also use hops like EKG and Amarillo to blend with these higher AA hops and having good luck.

This may also be a good hop to combine with Chinook... I see endless possibilities.. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/tongue.gif)

Looking forward to the real time experiences in the near future. I'll be sure to tell my stories.
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