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> Going Electric - almost there...
rbarr110
post Apr 11 2008, 06:36 PM
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QUOTE(stangbat @ Apr 11 2008, 02:22 PM) *
No, I'd like to learn how to do it too.

Looks great. Thanks for the pics.


+ 1 on that note.
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stevehaun
post Apr 11 2008, 08:50 PM
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Very nicely done!
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dc2002
post Apr 14 2008, 07:28 AM
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Report:

I brewed last Friday - Dennys Rye IPA and I must say it was a pleasure to brew on.

I filled the HLT almost full ~12-13 gallons and set the temp at 165. Then I filled the cooler with probably about 40Qts of water (estimated) knowing that I would need 45 to dough in. Water was about 58-59 deg. Then I fired up the pump to recirc the mash tun water throught the HERMS to heat up the strike water. Worked like a champ - the HLT reached temp in about 35-40 minutes and the mash tun reached temp in about 20-25 minutes after that - although I guess I could have recirculated from the get go and not waited for the HLT first. Be interesting to see if that saves any time...That is a lot of water to heat up....

Doughed in and topped up the mash tun with a little more water to be on the thinner side to avoid a stuck runoff. While mashing I just reset the temp to 180. The runoff never stuck and the silver solder held up great - NO leaks. I cant wait to install the sight glass...I was extra cautious not to run the element dry...

Next step is to install an element in the kettle and be 100% propane free...

Man, that little Auber PID is a really nice unit. I am very happy with it.

This post has been edited by dc2002: Apr 14 2008, 07:29 AM
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P-J
post Apr 14 2008, 08:04 AM
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QUOTE(dc2002) *
~~~ and the mash tun reached temp in about 20-25 minutes after that - ~~~

That is one fast heat exchange. Awesome. I can only guess what will happen once the stir motor is placed.
QUOTE
~~~ and the silver solder held up great - NO leaks.

Of course it did. (Tensile Strength 14,000 psi & Shear Strength 10,600 psi) It is not going anywhere and you did a great job prepping and soldering.. (IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/smile.gif)
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DavidS
post Apr 14 2008, 08:23 AM
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QUOTE(Ibrew @ Apr 11 2008, 04:59 PM) *
(IMG:style_emoticons/brewboard/eh.gif) Am I the only one who don't understand how solder brass on stainless?

Anyway, that's a freaking good looking HLT!!!


I do not know what braze alloy/flux he used but Lucas Milhaupt/Handy Harman Braze 560 and the B1 flux should do the trick. I would stay away from the cadmium containing silver braze alloys for my beer.

I work with brazing every day but have never tried brass to stainless. I know we use the Easy Flow 45 and the B1 flux for brazing stainless to copper. We helium leak test these joints day in and day out. The problem is it does contain cadmium.
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P-J
post Apr 14 2008, 08:53 AM
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QUOTE(DavidS) *
I do not know what braze alloy/flux he used but Lucas Milhaupt/Handy Harman Braze 560 and the B1 flux should do the trick. I would stay away from the cadmium containing silver braze alloys for my beer.

I work with brazing every day but have never tried brass to stainless. I know we use the Easy Flow 45 and the B1 flux for brazing stainless to copper. We helium leak test these joints day in and day out. The problem is it does contain cadmium.

The solder and flux beng used is Harris brand Stay-Brite 8 solder and Stay-Clean liqud flux. The solder is solid at 430 deg F and is completly liquid at 535 deg F. This gives it a plastic range of 105 deg. It can be used easily with a common propane or MAP torch. The flux was developed and is used for soldering stainless as well as copper, brass, etc. The solder alloy is 5.5% to 6.0% Silver and the remainder is Tin.

I've been using it for years with excellent results.

HTH
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dc2002
post Apr 14 2008, 08:55 AM
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It is a liquid flux - Harris Stay Clean - Paul (P-J) may have more info - he said there is a flux that will work an aluminum too...

FYI...I used a standard blue bottle propane torch - not Mapp...

This post has been edited by dc2002: Apr 14 2008, 08:59 AM
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stangbat
post Apr 14 2008, 09:00 AM
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Florian mentioned using some kind of "pencil" when soldering that starts to melt once you reach the right temp. He said you heat and quickly touch the area with the pencil and when it leaves a mark you are ready to apply the solder. Is this handy at all or have you used it?

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dc2002
post Apr 14 2008, 09:14 AM
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I did not...I just applied the heat to the fitting and once it was hot enough the solder just flowed right in...

The hardest part was the box...that needed a lot of heat to get the solder to flow - plus I didnt want to disturb the element fitting.

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DJ in KC
post Apr 14 2008, 09:23 AM
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QUOTE(dc2002 @ Apr 14 2008, 09:14 AM) *
....I just applied the heat to the fitting and once it was hot enough the solder just flowed right in...


That's the way I've used it too. I remember Swag or Florian telling me about the pencil torch. If/when I use it again I might try that. It seemed to me that you couldn't use too much flux either.

dj
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P-J
post Apr 14 2008, 09:27 AM
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QUOTE(stangbat @ Apr 14 2008, 10:00 AM) *
Florian mentioned using some kind of "pencil" when soldering that starts to melt once you reach the right temp. He said you heat and quickly touch the area with the pencil and when it leaves a mark you are ready to apply the solder. Is this handy at all or have you used it?

Sounds interesting. I did a Google looking for info. Nada.. I just use the solder as my indicator. I apply it to the parts -never in the flame. When it flows it's good to go. I can see where it would be a huge help in brazing though. That process is a little tougher for me to control and master as the temps are higher and brazing large pieces requires a boat load of heat.
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DavidS
post Apr 14 2008, 12:17 PM
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The temperature indicating crayons are called Tempil Sticks. They come at a variety different melting temperatures. TempilStick Link

The braze/solder material is the best temperature indicator. Most braze/solder alloys have a very definite liquidus temperature.
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dc2002
post Apr 24 2008, 07:59 AM
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Another step forward...got the sight gauge mounted.

In discussing this with P-J, we wanted to come up with a more elegant mounting solution for the tube than just drill a hole and screw in an eye screw...A few cuts of copper and Stay Brite 8 silver solder to the rescue!!!

Holding the fabricated eyelet in place with the vise grips
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC02399.jpg)
First one done
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC02401.jpg)
Both lined up nicely
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC02400.jpg)
Drilled and mounted the elbow - all soldered in place. Using HDPE tubing on a barb with a flare nut that screws on to the elbow
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC02403.jpg)
Close up of the fitting
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC01613-s.jpg)
Close up of the eyelet
(IMG:http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a125/kdcj2002/brew/DSC01616-s.jpg)
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stangbat
post Apr 24 2008, 10:08 AM
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I've got to learn to solder this stuff. That is so cool. I'm such a hack with a soldering iron and torch though. It is kind of like me and playing pool. For as much pool as I've played in my life, you'd think I would be good. Same goes with soldering.

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P-J
post Apr 24 2008, 10:41 AM
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QUOTE(stangbat @ Apr 24 2008, 11:08 AM) *
I've got to learn to solder this stuff. That is so cool. I'm such a hack with a soldering iron and torch though. It is kind of like me and playing pool. For as much pool as I've played in my life, you'd think I would be good. Same goes with soldering.

If you are serious about that - I'd be more than happy to walk you through it. We all need a believer in the KC league. You guys already have a lock on the primo machinist with Swagman, so making the fittings would not be a problem. The ideas that you guys conger up are also great. So.... Get on with the StayBrite 8 program...

Just think about the grief you would have if a welded fitting become damaged. Soldered? A little heat and out it comes. Aluminum kettle? No problem.. Solder a brass fiting in place.. Stainless kettle? No problem..Solder a stainless fitting in place..

Think about it. It's easy.. - And - I'd be happy to help.

Paul
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